Tag Archives: car scam

Car Seller Scam – Is This a Car Scam?

Online car buyers exposed to common car scam by criminal sellers

car scamUsers of online car buying sites such as AutoTrader, Craigslist, online newspaper classified auto ads, and other non-dealer car sites often find unbelievable good deals, only to find it was no deal at all, but a common car seller scam.

We often hear the question, “Is this a scam?” from car buyers who have found a “great deal” online. Buyers become suspicious because the price is “too good” and the payment and pickup arrangements seem a little fishy.

Cheap cars advertised on Internet sites can be scams, and it is relatively easy to spot them after the seller has been contacted, but not before. A car-for-sale ad placed by a scammer looks like any other ad — except the price is much lower than normal. They even provide pictures and VIN numbers of real cars (snagged somewhere on the Internet) to make the ads seem more believable. In short, you can’t determine if a car ad is a scam by the information in the ad itself.

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Cars for Teens – Top 10 Questions

We have been an expert participant on the Yahoo! Answers web site for many years, particularly in the Cars and Transportation section, Buying & Selling sub-section. We answer questions and provide advice about a wide variety of topics related to automobile buying, selling, insurance, maintenance, and car brands.

Although the Answers site is open to anyone, we have found that most visitors and questioners are teenagers and young adults who have had little or no experience in buying, selling, or owning cars. Their questions are natural and appropriate for someone who is doing some of these things for the first time.

The web site is quite popular and is very active. Thousands of questions are asked — and answered — each day. However, in our years of participation we have seen many of the same questions being asked over and over — and over — and over again.

We have compiled what we think are the top 10 questions that teens and young adults want to know about cars. Here they are.

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Are You a Car Salesman’s Dream Customer?

There’s one kind of car buying customer that sales people just love. They are “payment buyers.” 

A car salesperson’s job is to sell cars — and make maximum profit for his dealership. The way to make maximum profit is by selling at the highest possible prices and including as many “add-on” extra items or services as possible.

Some customers are an easy sale but are difficult to make a big profit from. Others are easy on both counts. The latter of these two types are the kind of customers that car salespeople love.

A salesperson’s dream customer is one who has done little or no research about cars they might be interested in, understands almost nothing about the car buying process, knows little about car pricing, has few negotiating skills, but most of all, wants to negotiate monthly payments, and only monthly payments. These customers are called “payment buyers.”

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How to Really Screw Up a Car Purchase

According to questions I see posted on Yahoo Answers, there are a huge number of first car buyers out there who have somehow found exactly the WRONG way to buy a car. They then look for help AFTER they realize their mistake. It’s nearly always too late by that time.

Here’s how NOT to buy a car:

Leave a deposit with a seller or dealer for a car you are not absolutely sure you’re going to buy. The problem is that you may not be able to get your deposit back if you change your mind, unless there is a clear written document that states that you’ll get your deposit refunded and under what conditions. In the worst case scenario, the seller sells the car to someone else AND keeps your deposit. Don’t leave deposits unless you absolutely must.

Buy a used car without having it inspected by a professional mechanic before the purchase. Used cars are sold “as-is” which means you can’t get your money back if you find the car has problems later. There are no “right-of-return” or used-car lemon laws to protect you, even if you feel the seller or dealer committed fraud. You can’t rely on a seller’s statement that a car “runs fine” or “has no problems.” A mechanic’s inspection will cost $75-$125 but can prevent you from making a multi-thousand dollar mistake.

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Common Car Scam

car scamThe most common car scam is one in which a nice car is listed for sale at a low price on Craigslist.com, Autotrader.com, or other web site.

There is no hint, other than the low price, that it is a scam. They show you a couple of good pictures of the car and even provide the VIN number.

So, what’s the problem.

The problem is that the picture of the car and the VIN were snagged somewhere on the Internet and it’s not the “seller’s” car. In fact, the “seller” is only trying to get your attention so that he can separate you from your money.

You won’t find out enough details to determine it’s a scam until you contact the “seller.” At that time you’ll get an email from him much like this one:

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