Category Archives: credit

Do I Need A Co-Signer?

Who needs a co-signer for a car loan? How does it work?

need a co-signer for car loanNew or first-time car buyers are often surprised at being turned down for a car loan because they have no credit history, which unfortunately has about the same effect as having bad credit. Getting a co-signer might be the answer.

Lenders want to see that a borrower has a good record with previous loans and credit cards. Without a history of credit, a borrower represents a risk to lenders. If they don’t know a borrower’s history, they take the low road and assume the worst.

It’s a familiar “catch-22″ situation in that you can’t get a loan to establish credit without already having credit. So what is the answer?

What is the answer?

The most common solution is to have someone “co-sign” your loan contract. Typically, it’s family member who has a good credit score. A co-signer plays no part in the loan unless the primary borrower fails to make payments. In that case, the loan company would have the right to seek payment from the co-signer.

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Deciding on Your First Car

Your First Car – Making Your Decision

first carMost of us get our first car as teenagers. It’s the car we’ll always remember.

Let’s take a look at some of the important questions you’ll want to consider when deciding about what you’ll buy as your first car, how you’ll pay for it, and how to go about the purchase.

How much can you spend?

If cost is not important and you can choose practically any car you want, we’ll get to you later. However, most teens have restrictions on how much they can spend. It might be that your parents are buying and have set a price limit, or that you have your own budget and a limited income.

Since most teens start driving before they become of legal age to sign a car loan contract, it’s typical to pay cash for their first car. The cash can come from savings, gifts from relatives, or a loan from parents — or a combination. Usually, it’s not enough money for a brand new car, but possibly sufficient for a good used car.

The amount of money you have to spend on your first car will directly affect your choices. Lots of money, lots of choices. Little money, fewer choices. In general, the more money you spend, the better the car — better condition, better mileage, better performance, better safety, and better reliability.

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How to Find Cheap Auto Insurance

Is Cheap Car Insurance Possible?

Auto insurance is one of those irritating expenses of car ownership that has no immediately obvious benefit. We pay and pay, and may never get anything in return. Teenage first car buyers are always a bit startled by the high cost of insurance.

Car insurance is one of the most expensive costs of owning and driving a car, especially for teenagers and other new drivers who can least afford it.

In this article we’ll show you how and where to find the car insurance company for your first car that has the best rates and provides the best service.

We frequently hear the question, “Which auto insurance company is best?” or “Where can I find the cheapest car insurance?” or “What is the cheapest insurance for a 16 year old?” It would be nice if there were a quick simple answer to those questions.

Continue reading How to Find Cheap Auto Insurance

How to Buy a Car with Bad Credit

buy car with bad creditBuying a car with a low credit score?

Having bad credit means that sometime in your past, possibly as far back as seven or ten years, you have had missed or late loan payments, repossessed property or cars, or have declared bankruptcy. You may also have an excessive number of credit cards with high balances. These factors are included in your credit history reports that come from three credit reporting agencies: Transunion, Experian, and Equifax.

Your entire credit history is summarized in a single number, called your credit score.

Your credit score determines if you’ll get approved for a car loan, how much you’ll in interest, how much down payment you’ll pay, and even how much you’ll pay for auto insurance.

Continue reading How to Buy a Car with Bad Credit

How Car Loan Payments Work

how car loans workAbout principal and interest

If you purchase a new or used car with a loan, you agree to pay off the loan amount (principal) over a specified number of months. But you also agree to pay a finance charge, or interest, for the privilege of using the bank’s (or finance company’s) money for your purchase.

The amount of finance charge that you pay is the interest rate, which is set by the bank or finance company based generally on national lending rates and more specifically on your credit score. Interest rate is expressed as a annual percentage rate (APR), such as 5.5%.

Interest rates can be different for the same loan amount

Wholesale lending rates are lower now than in recent years but banks and finance companies, as well as dealers, can boost these rates (called reserve) for their customers. You can check current national average auto loan rates at Bankrate.com. At the time of this writing, the average 36 month new-car loan rate was 3.93% — very low. But automotive consumers may pay higher rates depending on the lender, dealer reserve, and the customer’s credit score.

Auto buyers should always know their most recent credit score before going car shopping. Otherwise, dealers know more about you than you know about yourself, which could lead to some unpleasant surprises. Getting your credit score is easy enough online. What’s your FICO score? Find out now when you check your credit report for $1 at Experian.com!

Continue reading How Car Loan Payments Work

First Car – Lease a Car?

Should I Lease my First Car?

lease a car first carMany people who are looking for an economical way to drive a new car, perhaps their first car, will look at leasing as a possible solution.

The consideration of leasing is often based on a mistaken belief that leasing is like renting and doesn’t require good credit as does buying with a loan. It isn’t renting and it does require good credit.

But is leasing a car a good solution for first-time car buyers?

The answer is — it depends.

If the first-time buyer is a teenager, less than 18 years old, leasing is not an answer.

Since leasing is a form of financing, similar to a loan, it requires that the customer be of legal age and have a good credit history. Furthermore, even if the teen’s parent leases a car to be driven by the teen, it’s still not a good idea.

A teen may not be able to stick with the requirements of a lease — an annual mileage limit of 10,000-12,000 miles, no customization of the vehicle, and minimal wear-and-tear. Insurance may be more expensive than anticipated due to the higher coverage requirements of a lease.

Continue reading First Car – Lease a Car?

Cars for Teens – Top 10 Questions

We have been an expert participant on the Yahoo! Answers web site for many years, particularly in the Cars and Transportation section, Buying & Selling sub-section. We answer questions and provide advice about a wide variety of topics related to automobile buying, selling, insurance, maintenance, and car brands.

Although the Answers site is open to anyone, we have found that most visitors and questioners are teenagers and young adults who have had little or no experience in buying, selling, or owning cars. Their questions are natural and appropriate for someone who is doing some of these things for the first time.

The web site is quite popular and is very active. Thousands of questions are asked — and answered — each day. However, in our years of participation we have seen many of the same questions being asked over and over — and over — and over again.

We have compiled what we think are the top 10 questions that teens and young adults want to know about cars. Here they are.

Continue reading Cars for Teens – Top 10 Questions

Auto Loan Rates – How to Get the Best Rates

car loan rateWhen you buy a car with a loan, you not only pay back the amount borrowed but you also pay finance charges (interest).  Each month’s loan payment consists partly of principle and partly of interest. Actually, the amount of principle and interest changes each month, although the total remains the same. In the beginning, you pay more interest and less principle. Near the end of the loan, you are paying nearly all principle.

The amount of finance charges you pay depends on the interest rate and the length (term) of your loan. Interest rates can vary between different lenders. The interest rate you pay also depends on your credit score. Someone with poor credit will pay a higher rate than someone with outstanding credit. More about credit later.

Interest rates are generally higher for used cars than for new cars. And longer loan terms have higher interest rates than shorter loans.

At the time of this writing the national average new-car interest rate is about 3.0% for a 4-year car loan and a bit higher for used car loans. Dealers sometimes add a percentage point or two for additional profit. This is called “reserve.”

Continue reading Auto Loan Rates – How to Get the Best Rates

5 Tips for Getting an Auto Loan

tips for getting auto loansFor many people, an auto loan is the most significant and largest financial transaction they make in their lives — at least until they get a home mortgage. Because it is so significant, it makes sense to take the right steps and avoid mistakes in the process.

1. First, shop around for auto loans at your local banks, credit unions, and financial companies. You don’t have to finance through your car dealer. In fact, by shopping around first, you’ll know if your dealer’s loan offer is good or not. When you talk to a bank or credit union, you may also be able to get pre-approved at a guaranteed interest rate and for a given amount. That way, you’ll know what price car you can afford when you go to your dealer. You are not obligated to accept any loan offer you receive, even those for which you are pre-approved.

2. Know your credit score. Your credit can make the difference between getting approved for a car loan or not. If you are approved, your credit score will determine the interest rate you pay and the down payment amount you’ll have to make. Car companies offer special promotional deals each month, such as 0% APR loans and low-payment leases, which require good credit. To get the best rates and best deals you’ll need a credit score of 700 or above. What’s your FICO score? Find out now when you check your credit report for $1 at Experian.com!
Continue reading 5 Tips for Getting an Auto Loan

What is a Credit Report?

credit reportHow do I get my credit reports and my credit score?

Whenever you apply for any type of credit or financing, a credit report is pulled from at least one of the three major credit bureaus. While there are hundreds of smaller credit bureaus around the country, virtually every credit bureau is affiliated with Trans Union, Experian, or Equifax.

These credit bureaus collect and maintain information on the vast majority of Americans, but they are not affiliated with the government in any way. The credit bureaus are for-profit corporations that sell your personal information for money.

The credit bureaus receive your personal information through the same lenders who grant you credit. They have agreements with each of these credit grantors that require the credit grantor to inform the credit bureaus of everything that occurs in your relationship with the credit grantor. If you make a payment late, the negative credit listing is quickly reported to at least one of the three major credit bureaus and is added to your credit history.

Low Interest Rate Car Deals

Car manufacturers and dealers often have special loan rates available for limited-time promotions. Are these deals worth considering? Do you save money by accepting low-interest loan deals?

We see a lot of variations of low-interest loan rates from car manufacturers. Some are 3.9%, some, 1.9%, some 0.9%, and even 0%. What’s the difference? Is a 0% APR deal much better than a 1.9% APR deal?

First of all, low-interest loan rates are almost always limited-time promotional deals being offered by finance companies associated with a car manufacturers, such as Ford’s Ford Credit or Honda’s Honda Financial Services. Dealers do not set loan rates. Customers sometimes incorrectly think that, with a high credit score, they should be able to get a 0% or super-low interest rate at any time.

Let’s take a look at how low-interest new-car loans stack up.

Continue reading Low Interest Rate Car Deals

First Car Questions

We answer questions from first-car buyers almost every day when we participate on the Yahoo! Answers web site in the Car Buying and Selling section. The majority of those questions come from teens and young adults who have little or no experience in buying, trading, or selling cars.

In the few years that we’ve been doing it, we have seen certain common questions come up over and over again. Some come up numerous times in a single day.

We thought we would post some of the most frequent questions here, and answer them just as we do on Yahoo! Answers.

Here goes.

Q.  How many miles are too much for a used car?  How many miles will I get from this used car?

A. All used cars are different. It’s not possible to say that a certain car of a certain age and of a certain brand that has 150,000 miles is a good car. It depends on how it has been driven and cared for. Some cars with only 50,000 miles are ready for the junk yard, while others with 150,000 miles are good for another 150,000.  Even brands such as Honda and Toyota, that are known to be very reliable, can have serious high-mileage problems. Therefore, don’t make a purchase decision based on mileage alone. Get a professional mechanic to inspect your car before you buy. It’s the actual condition of the car, not mileage, that is important.

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How to Buy a Car from an Individual Seller

How do I buy a car from an individual private seller — not a dealer?

When you buy a car from an individual, you pay with cash, a money order, or a bank cashiers check. The money can come from savings, a checking account, a family loan, or a loan from a bank or financial company. Most sellers do not like personal checks.

Buyers sometimes expect a private seller to “take payments” but any smart seller will not agree to such a plan. It is too risky. As a buyer, it’s better to get your own loan.

Requirements for a car loan

Loans from banks or finance companies require that you have a not-so-bad credit score, have an income sufficient to repay the loan, and have no excessive debts that might interfer with your ability to repay the loan. Loan companies do not want to give money to people who are unable to repay a loan.

Buying a car with bad credit – or no credit

People who have a bad credit history — a history of not making payments on time or of missing payments on other loans – will have problems getting a car loan. The lender will assume that if you have had problems in the past, there is a good chance that you’ll have problems again.

Continue reading How to Buy a Car from an Individual Seller

Can I Refinance My Car Loan?

refinance auto loanRefinancing your car loan can often lower your monthly payments.

Auto loan interest rates are hovering at the lowest rates seen in many years. If you are currently paying a high rate, you may be able to benefit by refinancing at a lower rate.

Depending on the value of your car and the amount you owe on your loan, you might even be able to refinance and get cash back out of the deal.

Refinancing an auto loan is similar to getting any other used-car loan. You might refinance with the same company with which you have your current loan, or you might go to a different bank or loan company.

If you bought your car new and financed your loan through the car manufacturer’s “captive” finance company, you might find that the company does not do refinance loans. In this case, you’ll have to go to a bank or loan company for your loan.

Loan rates vary between different banks and finance companies. Refinance rates are usually higher than new-car rates, but lower than ordinary used-car rates. Shop around for the best rates.

Continue reading Can I Refinance My Car Loan?

Should I Buy From a Buy-Here-Pay-Here Dealer?

buy here pay here dealersBuy-here-pay-here car dealers provide auto loans to people with bad credit.

Most car dealers do not directly finance loans on cars they sell. They work with outside banks and finance companies to provide loans for their customers. It’s up to those banks and finance companies, not the dealer, to approve and provide customers car loans.

However, a different breed of used car dealer, called  “buy-here-pay-here” dealers,  do provide their own financing without an outside bank or loan company. They primarily function to sell used cars to people who have bad credit and cannot get approved for loans from conventional sources.

Buy-here-pay-here (BHPH) dealers can be recognized by their promotional ads or storefront signs. They use the terms “easy finance” or “no credit checks” or “we finance anybody” or “in-house financing” or “fast loan approval” or “we approve you regardless of your credit.”  They are sometimes called “tote the note” dealers. Continue reading Should I Buy From a Buy-Here-Pay-Here Dealer?

Where to Find 0% APR Car Deals

zero percent 0% car loan financingCar manufacturers offer special sales incentives every month on particular vehicle makes, models, and styles. Incentives vary from month to month.

Incentives come in the form of direct-to-customer rebates, special lease deals, and low-interest loans, including 0% APR loan deals. See Best Car Deals for current new-car incentives, including 0% loans.

Zero percent financing, when offered, means that the customer pays no interest or finance charges on his car loan. This saves money. Monthly payments are smaller and total costs are reduced.

Calculating payments for a zero percent loan is easy. Simply divide the cost of the car by the number of months in the loan. Non-zero-percent loans are much more difficult to calculate and require a car loan calculator.

Are 0% loans good deals?

Maybe.

Continue reading Where to Find 0% APR Car Deals

Car Loan Basics for First Time Car Buyers

A Car Loan Story

David, 17, recently graduated from high school, landed a good paying job, and wanted to buy a new car.

His thought was that he would go to his neighborhood Ford dealer where he had been admiring a bright red Focus model that he felt he could afford, and arrange for a convenient loan to pay for it. He could easily get approved for the loan because his father knows the owner of the dealership.

The car cost $12,000 with discounts and rebates. He thought a 5 year (60 months) loan would be about right because he figured payments to be $200 a month ($12,000 divided by 60 months), which he could easily afford.

David was wrong — in many ways. Let’s see why. Continue reading Car Loan Basics for First Time Car Buyers

Money for Your First Car

money for carThe need or desire for a first car often comes before sufficient money is available.

This is especially true for many teenagers or college graduates who are eager to buy that first car, but lack the necessary funds. What to do?

This is a common problem for lots of folks buying their first car. It can be solved in a number of ways.

There are essentially four ways to get money for a car:

  1. Save the money
  2. Be gifted the money
  3. Borrow the money
  4. Earn the money

Let’s take a closer look at each of these ways:

Continue reading Money for Your First Car